• Craft beer night introduces Manitoba products, raises funds

    Craft beer night introduces Manitoba products, raises funds

    Although numbers might have been down from previous years, Prairie Partners once again were able to connect locals with made-in-Manitoba beverages to raise money for a worthy cause.

    The night before St. Patrick’s Day, March 16, was the date for the third annual Craft Beer Tasting at the Sawmill. According to Prairie Partners Executive Director Misheyla Iwasiuk, the event again went well.

    “It was good,” she said, “It was fun and it seemed like everyone out there had a good time.”

    There were about 50 participants this year. Iwasiuk said that was down a bit from previous years, but they had a fair bit of competition on that night. There were two socials in the area, and the Border Kings were hosting Gladstone in the first game of the Tiger Hills Hockey League finals. However, they raised around $1,300, which was in line with previous years.

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  • Minto trying to reverse business losses 

    Minto trying to reverse business losses 

    With some help from the Municipality of Grassland, Minto is looking to turn around at least some of their recent business losses.

    A small but vibrant community, Minto has seen some unfortunate shut downs in the recent months. Now, with the resignation of the postmaster, the municipality is getting involved in finding a solution.

    “The postmaster decided to quit the job,” explained Municipality of Grassland Councillor Ruth Mealy. “Canada Post has advertised for a new one, and I have heard there have been several who applied. The municipality wants to be pro-active and support the continuity.”

    The post office has been in the Minto Community Market, and one of the market owners, Aglaia Englebrecht had been running it. However, she resigned as of March 1. The search began with Canada Post saying the application deadline for the position was on March 13. Until filled, the office remains open with part-time personnel.

  • Search for driver replacement highlights handi-van importance

    Search for driver replacement highlights handi-van importance

    As they say farewell to their head driver and search for a replacement, the Boissevain Transit Committee realizes the importance of their continuing service.

    On March 1, Ken Dixon retired from driving the handi-van. According to Raylene Conway-Smith of the committee, he had been driving for them since July of 2006. He has been the primary driver and they are looking to replace him, although they do have a few casuals. Between trips in and out of town and delivering groceries, Dixon has made an outstanding contribution to the service, says committee chair Howard Dalrymple.

    “There was a time we were going through the head drivers every six months,” said Dalrymple, who has been involved in the committee for many years, and head for five. “Not the last while. Ken’s done a lot of work, I would say above and beyond the call of duty.”

  • Municipality fighting for two mill rates between town and rural, preparing for one

    Municipality fighting for two mill rates between town and rural, preparing for one

    Although willing to continue to fight for what works best, Boissevain-Morton Council also does not want to hit a deadline without working out options.

    Council held a meeting with the public on February 25. The gist was to let the public know what was in store for the community when the next step of amalgamation was completed, if they were not able to get the Province of Manitoba to be flexible.

    In 2015, the Town of Boissevain and the RM of Morton were amalgamated into one municipality. It was not a marriage that either bride or groom were thrilled with, but instead was arranged by their Provincial parent. The Manitoba Government of the time had decreed a few years before that smaller corporations had to become one, with the nuptials to be completed by January of 2015. Although Boissevain-Morton were now of one flesh, they did have one prenuptial agreement – separate mill rates for taxes, which recognized the unique character of the couple.

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